Tag Archive: spicy

Chalupas

Another quick and easy southwest favorite that is somewhat healthified.  I love Mexican food in that with a few staples in your pantry you can use them in any combination.  The flavorings can increase or decrease the heat to your liking.  I always find that Mexican food makes me just full enough.  The staples have a lot of protein and fiber.  Used correctly they can be really healthy.  Enjoy this quick and easy family favorite of mine.  Don’t use store bought seasoning packets.  They are half salt and don’t allow you to adjust the flavors to your liking.  A few simple seasonings in your cabinet will get you just the flavor you want.

  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 1 onion diced
  • 1 jalapeno seeded and diced
  • 1 pound ground turkey breast
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon chipotle chile powder
  • 1 teaspoon Hungarian parika
  • Salt and Pepper
  • 1 cup  of water
  • 6 corn tortillas
  • Pam
  • 1 15 oz can refried black beans (fat free)
  • 1 head of Romaine or Iceberg Lettuce (chopped finely)
  • 1 diced tomato
  • ¾ cup of grated cheddar-jack or pepper-jack cheese
  • Salsa

Preheat oven to 350

Over medium high heat add oil, onion and jalapeno into a sauce pan.  Cook until onion and jalapeno are softened.  Crumble ground turkey into the pan.  As you stir and brown the turkey and the seasonings one at a time and mix completely.  When the turkey is cooked and all of the seasonings have been mixed in add the cup of water and stir.  Bring to a boil and let all of the water cook out , stirring occasionally.  This takes about half an hour.

While the turkey is cooking, spray a cookie sheet with PAM and lay out the corn tortillas.  Spray the tops lightly and place in the oven until crisp.  About 13 minutes.

Heat the refried beans in the microwave or on the stove top.  I like to do mine on the stove top and mix in some salsa for extra flavor.

When the turkey is cooked and the tortillas and beans are ready, you are set to assemble.  Spread 2 or 3 tablespoons of beans on a tortilla.  Top with ½ cup of the turkey mixture, cheese, lettuce, tomato and salsa.  You could add guacamole or sour cream too.

Then crunch a way.  To super slim these, add the seasoning to the beans and skip the turkey.

Did you submit your favorite cookie recipe to my holiday cookie exchange?

Cookies 2012

 

Sharing with:

Growing HomeBack for Seconds

 

Southwest Stew with Cornbread Boats

The Terlingua chili Cookoff people say, “You don’t know beans about chili if you put beans in your chili.”   – definitely not turkey.  So, this is called Southwest Stew.  The perfect thing for a rainy day with nothing to do.  I love chiles in all their forms and flavors.  This meal is a reflection of that.  Also, I am forbidden to buy more spices until I use the ones I have.  This will make a good dent in that.  I miss my friends at Savory Spice Shop in the Arboretum.

For the stew:

  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 1 white onion
  • 2 jalapenos
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 1.5 pounds of turkey
  • 2 tablespoons of Organic Ground Cumin Seeds from Savory Spice
  • 2 tablespoons of Black Canyon chili powder from Savory Spice
  • 1 tablespoon of chipotle chili powder
  • 2 tablespoons of Sweet and Spicy Hungarian Paprika from Savory Spice
  • 1 tablespoon of Montreal steak seasoning
  • 1 10 oz. can of diced tomatoes and jalapenos
  • 2 4 oz. cans of diced Hatch green chiles (I used hot)
  • 2 15 oz. cans of black beans rinsed and strained
  • 64 oz. of low sodium tomato juice

For the cornbread:

  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1 cup stone ground cornmeal
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon melted butter

For stew:

Peel the onions and chop into 8 chunks and place in the food processor.  Chop the tops off of two fresh jalapenos.  If you are afraid of heat….you probably shouldn’t make this, but you can remove the seeds and ribs of  the jalapeños.  Cut in half and place in food processor with the onion.  Peel three cloves of garlic and give a light mince.  Add to food processor.   Pulse until finely chopped.

In a Dutch oven set over medium heat sautee onion, garlic and jalapeños in olive oil until softened.  Add turkey and crumble.  As the turkey browns add the spices one at a time and mix.  Cook and stir until turkey is cooked through and spices are spread evenly.  Add diced tomatoes and green chiles.   Stir to combine.  Add tomato juice and black beans.  Reduce heat to low and get your tasting bowl ready.

Cook over low heat stirring frequently for at least 6 hours if not more.  You could transfer to a crockpot at this point.  After the first hour, taste for seasoning.  If it is too hot add a little sugar or apple cider vinegar one teaspoon at a time up to four or add a square of bakers chocolate.  Continue to taste as flavors will evolve during the cooking time.

For cornbread:

Preheat oven to 450° .

In a large bowl, stir the cornmeal, salt and baking soda together. Stir in the egg, melted butter and buttermilk.

Bake in a mini-loaf or muffin pan for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven when the top of cornbread is brown and it feels firm to the touch.  Immediately turn out to keep from over-drying.

To serve:

Cut out a large wedge or circle from individual muffins.  Fill with stew and set in bowl with a thin layer of stew.  Sprinkle with cheese.  Add a small dollop of sour cream and top with cut out wedge.

Sharing this week with:
Down Home Blog HopMake-Ahead Meals for Busy Moms Jam Hands

 

 

 

Foodie Friends Friday

Mexican Hamburgers

I grew up in West Texas during the oil boom of the 50’s and 60’s.   The oil flowed like water and everybody who wanted a job had one.  In those days oil field workers worked 24-hours a day, 7-days a week, 365-days a year.  Holidays were hard to squeeze in with family.  We sometimes had Christmas on an alternate day if Daddy was not going to be home.   Wink is 7 miles from Kermit (nothing to do with the frog).  Wink is famous for the “Wink sink hole” and Roy Orbison (He sang Pretty Woman).   We are talking big west Texas oil towns here.  Some of the best tastin’ food I have ever eaten was right there.  Hamburgers as big as a dinner plate at the diner after  football games, Frito pies at the DQ at lunch,  hot dogs and hamburgers at Cook’s store across the street from the elementary school,  soup and a sandwich at the drug store counter at lunch in Jr. High.  Good memories.  I was sick and missed a class reunion.  I guess that’s what got all this started.

Do you know what a Mexican hamburger is?  I (living in El Paso) had never heard of that, but my mother introduced it to us and even took my family to Wink to eat one.  You would have thought they had invented sliced bread.  Those were the talk of the town at afternoon coffee.  I made these more often than grilled burgers for a while.   The little diner where we went to eat these was deserted.  I wasn’t too sure about this, except my mom was a very picky eater and loved good Mexican food.   The plates of food they produced were huge.  Platter size white flour tortillas were spread with refried beans (pinto not black beans) and filled with fajita flavored burgers fried on the flattop griddle, shredded lettuce, tomatoes, grilled onions and green chilies or jalapeños, and cheese.  These were served with sides of guacamole, cream cheese, and salsa.  These are more or less a folded burrito.   But “drippin’ down your elbows” good food!

I sort of “healthified” these, but you don’t have to if you don’t want to.  If my son had been home they wouldn’t have been so healthy.  I made my own refried beans from leftover beans I had cooked by reducing the liquid and mashing them.  I used whole wheat tortillas.  They actually tasted good toasted on the griddle.

Mexican Hamburgers

  • 1 pound ground meat
  • Fajita seasoning blend
  • 1 can refried beans (I made my own from pinto beans I cooked with not so much salt and no lard)
  • grated Cheddar or Monterey Jack or Pepper Jack cheese
  • lettuce shredded (like for tacos)
  • diced tomatoes
  • chopped Hatch green chiles (roasted, peeled and diced)
  • grilled onions
  • salsa (hot or not to your taste) (I used my home canned salsa)
  • sour cream
  • avocados sliced or guacamole
  • sliced pickled jalapenos
  • large flour tortillas (I had whole wheat)

Form the ground meat into patties about 5” long by 3” wide.  Sprinkle with the dry fajita seasoning blend or seasoning of your choice.  Set aside.

Grate the cheese, dice the tomatoes, prepare the avocados.  Set up a serving station with all the burger toppings and sides in small dishes so everyone can make theirs according to their taste.

Fry the patties and allow to form a good caramelized crust on both sides.  Meanwhile toast the tortillas in a non-stick skillet or on a round griddle.  Toast just until slightly crisp and warmed.

Assembly:

  • A layer of beans spread on the entire surface of the tortilla
  • Meat
  • Grilled onions
  • Cheese
  • Lettuce
  • Tomatoes
  • Green chiles
  • Avocado/guacamole
  • Salsa
  • Sour cream
  • Fold over to make a very large taco
  • Several napkins

This will make 4 very large Mexican hamburgers.

 

Sharing this week with:
Growing Home

 

Thursday Favorite Things Miz Helen’s Country Cottage

Zucchini Boats

One last zucchini meal.  I really do like the things I have come up with this year.  This one is very tasty and it is an adaptation (very far removed).

Zucchini Boats

  • 2 Hatch green chiles, or 1 small can chopped green chiles
  • 2 cups corn kernels
  • 1 cup chopped red onion
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 medium zucchini squash
  • 1 cup cooked Israeli couscous
  • 4 ounces Colby-Jack cheese, shredded (about 1 cup packed, plus a little extra for sprinkling on top of tomatoes)

Wash and dry the chiles and leave the stems on, use a knife and slit about a 1” verticle slit near the stem, and place them on a grill, the broiler or over the open flame on your gas stove.   I prefer the gas grill outside when the weather permits. (In El Paso that is almost always!)  Turn them until they are charred on all sides.  Once they are blackened all over, put them in a bowl or pan and cover tightly with plastic wrap, a plastic bag or even foil.  You want them to steam completely.  They need to be cool enough to handle.  With the back of a paring knife slip the charred skin away by sliding the knife down the chile.  Remove as much of the blackened skin as possible.  A little char adds to the smoky flavor of the chile.  DO NOT RINSE THE CHILES when preparing them for sauces, enchiladas, pico de gallo or casseroles/stews, unless instructed in a recipe. Dice the chiles into ¼” dice.

Add corn and onion to a non-stick pan and cook for 10 minutes, half way through, stir mixture and then sprinkle with minced garlic. Add corn mixture to chopped chiles; stir in oregano, oil, lime juice, salt, cumin, and black pepper.

Cut the zucchini in half and scoop out the inside; set aside.

Cook the couscous according to the package instructions. Remove from heat; fluff with a fork. Add to corn mixture; toss well.  Add the cheese to the mixture and carefully combine all ingredients.

Preheat oven to 350°.

Spoon corn mixture evenly among each zucchini boat. Place in a baking dish.  Add about ¼ cup water to steam the squash.  Bake at 350° for 30 minutes. Remove from oven. Preheat broiler and sprinkle a little cheese on each zucchini. Broil 1 1/2 minutes or until cheese melts/browns. Serve immediately.

Sharing this week with Jam Hands and:
Foodie Friends Friday

Fish Tacos and Steak-Andy Cooks

A perfect post to share with Slightly Indulgent Tuesday’s!

All three of my children cook. They have their specialties and each has their favorites with their own twists.  My son has taken to cooking recently.  Healthy cooking at that!  This is a big change for him.  He was eating out A LOT and it wasn’t healthy.  He’s the baby of the family, but all grown up.  My two girls make delicious things too.  They aren’t too much into baking.  Amy makes great party food and Krista is very creative with herbs and chile.

I think this food blog is rubbing off on him.  He sends me some pictures of what he cooked for dinner and then immediately calls me to describe what it was he made for dinner.  When he calls it is usually around 900PM and I’m not prepared to write down all the ingredients.  He is into fish.  You will notice there are not too many (if any) recipes that use fish from me.  This is new for us all.  He didn’t learn to cook fish from me.

He made fish tacos because someone gave him some homegrown peppers at work.  That spurred him on to combine the peppers, cilantro, onion together in a skillet and sauté them.  He rubbed tilapia with red chile powder, salt, pepper and a seasoning blend and warmed his whole wheat tortillas in a skillet. Then he topped the grilled tilapia with the sautéd pepper mix, added an avocado and some lime juice.  I do believe he has great promise as a home cook.  He didn’t know what kinds of peppers they were, but they were HOT!  They look good.

 

Another evening he made a great steak and sent me that picture.  He uses a George Foreman table top grill that he loves.  I think this steak was marinated in Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper and a dry steak seasoning blend.  He marinated this overnight because he decided not to cook one night.  So it was well marinated when he cooked it.  He served it with asparagus and mushrooms he sautéed in butter.  Looks pretty good to me.

When he lived at home he made chicken breasts marinated in Italian salad dressing or he fried flautas.  They were a mess and guess who did the dishes?  Now he cooks things that don’t make a mess as he has to clean them up himself.  At least he is thinking healthy and that is way ahead of when I started thinking of eating healthy food.  Good idea for us all!